Last Updated: June 12th, 2024By

Fort Knox, Ky. – The Cadets from 2nd Regiment, Advanced Camp, spent the morning conducting Table IV, the first live-fire table in the Army’s Integrated Weapons Training Strategy, at Fort Knox, Ky., on June 12th, 2024.

A Cadet in 2nd Regiment, Advanced Camp, recieves instruction while completing Table IV in the Integrated Weapons Training Strategy, Fort Knox, Ky., June 12th, 2024. This course provides Cadets a chance to further practice before Table VI, qualification. | Photo by Sophia Hughes, The Ohio State University, CST Public Affairs Office

The IWTS is a training program that standardizes the terminology and tables used to describe live-fire training progression. The program includes six tables that break down training and testing into different areas, such as marksmanship instruction, pre-live fire simulations and practice qualification.

Cadets from 2nd Regiment, Advanced Camp, conduct Table IV ,Fort Knox, Ky., June 12th, 2024. This is the first live-fire table in the Integrated Weapons Training Strategy course and provides Cadets a chance to further practice before Table VI, qualification. | Photo by Sophia Hughes, The Ohio State University, CST Public Affairs Office

“We are doing our qualification range, so we are going to start with Table 4 which is making sure we are getting confirmation on our zeros,” said Cadet Jamie Borza from Penn State Harrisburg, 2nd Regiment, Bravo Company.

This is not Borza’s first time handling a live-fire weapon, as she has obtained plenty of prior experience. After graduating in 2015 from The Culinary Institute of America at the age of 19, Borza married an U.S. Infantryman and moved to Fort Campbell, Ky.

Not sure of her plan, Borza maintained an open mindset, saying, “Let’s just see where this goes.”

It wasn’t until Borza was told she was just a Civilian and didn’t understand what it was like to be a Soldier that she decided to join the Army as Field Artillery.

“I went field artillery and became a 13 Fox, which is a forward observer, and I loved every minute of that job.”

It was important for Borza to join with a more physical role as she spends her free time bodybuilding.

“I’ve competed nationally and stepped on stage a few times.”

As time went on, Borza gained interest in becoming an officer. For the next three years, Borza applied to become an officer but had no luck.

“I had applied to be an officer for the past three prior years, but I had no prior leadership time. They are looking for leadership skills and because I didn’t have any leadership time, they had nothing to look for.”

Cadet Joshua Elzie, 2nd Regiment, Advanced Camp, from Grambling State University, Ga., fires his M4 Carbine while completing Table IV, Fort Knox, Ky., June 12th, 2024. This is the first live-fire table in the Integrated Weapons Training Strategy course and provides Cadets a chance to further practice before Table VI, qualification. | Photo by Sophia Hughes, The Ohio State University, CST Public Affairs Office

It was Borza’s Company Commander that suggested she apply for The Green to Gold program, which helps active-duty enlisted Soldiers earn a commission as an Army Officer. The program offers several options for earning a baccalaureate or graduate degree while participating in the ROTC leadership program.

After her acceptance, Borza chose to return to school, this time studying Kinesiology, strengthening her knowledge to further her career as a personal trainer.

Borza is attending Advanced Camp as an upcoming senior but was scheduled to attend last summer’s training until receiving news that she was expecting.

“I was supposed to go to camp last summer but instead I was in the hospital having her.”

The news came to surface during a six-mile ruck march with her husband. Explaining she felt sick while completing the first four miles, she decided not to finish the last two miles. That evening the news was confirmed; she was pregnant with a little girl.

Borza and her husband were thrilled after having trouble in the past.

“We lost three before we had our little girl, and it was all in the same year too, it was the hardest year of our lives.”

She explained that attending school with a baby is a completely different ball game. Now not only does she need to make time to finish assignments, but she must also balance in being a mother.

Borza’s tight-knit peers and gracious parents have made raising her daughter much easier.

“I have no idea what I would have done without them to be quite honest.”

Even Borza’s professors were more than willing to help.

“One professor, we were taking an exam and he actually held her the whole time while I took the exam.”

Borza is eager to reconnect with her family but with a month left of Advanced Camp, she explains that being away from her daughter has been extremely hard.

“I have missed every single milestone. She stood up on her own while I’ve been gone and started talking.”

Borza will graduate on July 9th and will return home to Pennsylvania the following day.

“Yes she’ll be asleep when I get home but at least in the morning when she wakes up, she knows she’s going to have her mom again,” said Borza.

Cadet Jamie Borza, 2ng Regiment, Advanced Camp, from Penn State Harrisburg, Fort Knox, Ky., June 12th, 2024.

In her remaining time here at Fort Knox, Borza will continue to lead and encourage those around her. Understanding that many of these Cadets do not have experience, she says that “The best thing to do is stay calm. We are all here trying to do the same thing.”

About the Author: Sophia Hughes
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